July 1st, 2013

Dental Logo Design Tips in a Nutshell

Every business needs a logo, right?  So how do you create a logo that reflects who you are while still keeping it user friendly?  We wanted to offer some tips to consider when developing your next dental office logo.

Five dental logo design reminders

1. Keep it simple. Clean lines and easy to read fonts please.

2. Don’t overload. This is your logo, not your mission statement. Dental logos don’t need to include your web address, phone number or any other information besides your practice name and maybe a tagline.  So let your logo be the star of the show!

3. Think versatility. Your logo will be used on a variety of different mediums, from stationery to billboards to a sign outside your office.  If it’s scaled down to Polly Pocket size, or blown up on a Goodyear Blimp it should always look clean and be readable. Overly scripty or funky fonts become nearly impossible to read when shrunk down to fit on a pen.

4. Make it memorable. There are certain logos we all recognize (Nike, Starbucks, McDonalds) and it’s not only because they’re great brands that have been around for a zillion years, but also because they’ve made an impact on society.  We know the values of that company and the logo represents every interaction we’ve ever had with that brand. However, be careful that you’re making an impact in a good way. There are a number of logos that we are amazed made it past the company president (don’t share these with the kids) : Worst Logo Design Fails

5. Be relevant. This doesn’t mean you should overthink your brand, but you shouldn’t just throw something together because your cousin’s neighbor’s best friend came up with a cool design in art class (more on that in a second). Think of who you are and what you do. This doesn’t always have to be so literal. A dental logo is often stronger when it is symbolic or metaphorical; after all, Nike’s logo isn’t a shoe, is it? A lot of times a solid reflection of who you are can often lead to a great logo that has special meaning.

Back to the topic of your cousin’s neighbor’s friend, if you do have that person design your logo, make sure it’s done correctly in the proper design software and using appropriate color formats so that you can easily use it anywhere.

Use color carefully

Color is also a very important element in your logo – more important than you may think. Choosing color is not always easy because it can affect a design in a negative or positive way. Just because orange is your all-time favorite color doesn’t mean that you should use it in your logo. Logo colors should tie in to the office décor and style – is it contemporary, modern, classic, traditional? Whatever it is, your logo should complement it.

Even though you may want all the colors of the rainbow used in your logo, choosing two Pantone colors is usually best. Pantone stands for the Pantone Matching System or (PMS), a proprietary color space used in a variety of industries, primarily printing, though sometimes in the manufacture of colored paint, fabric, and plastics. PMS colors are more cost effective when printing professionally and make the finished outcome of your logo more consistent.

Taste the rainbow

If consistency of color is not a big deal to you, then four color process (CMYK) will be right up your alley – you can use a rainbow of colors in your logo.  Keep in mind that there might be times when your logo will need to be printed in black and white or grayscale.  This is a game changer and can make a logo lose it’s defining pizazz. Keep this in mind when in the logo designing process – it needs to look good in every format you will be using it in.

Who knew developing a new dental logo design was so complicated?  It’s a love/hate relationship that all businesses experience at least once, but when you have that perfect representation of who you really are, it’s totally worth it.  So bust out your Pantone swatches and spread the love!

 There you have it. Great logo design tips in a nutshell.

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